Applications of DuraChrome

The DuraChrome coating is applied to complete rods. It's ideal for the upgrade and repair of rods that are heavily surface damaged along the length, whereby localised chrome repairs would be uneconomical. This often saves the rod from being written off completely.
Our chrome plating facility is the only one of its kind in the North of England. It has been previously used in all manner of applications where engineering hard chrome is required. This even includes components for nuclear submarines and aircraft landing gear!
If you require a hard wearing coating with good corrosion resistance, DuraChrome is the coating for you.

About DuraChrome

DuraChrome is a world class chrome coating. Although the process is, in essence, similar to ordinary hard chrome plating, the end results are far superior. The main advantage is that DuraChrome offers dramatically reduced levels of corrosion and wear; resulting in a chrome surface which lasts far longer.

There is a fine science behind hard chrome plating and if the process is not controlled correctly, the resulting chrome surface will be of a poor quality. 

DuraChrome is not only controlled correctly when being applied, it has been developed over many years to produce a microscopic structure that has optimal properties for applications in hydraulics.

Standard Hard Chrome vs. DuraChrome

With a standard chrome application, macro crack patterns are usually formed within the surface of the coating. This gives a direct route to the underlying base material (Fig. 1), allowing for the ingress of substances which attack the base material over time. The result is a relatively short life expectancy in a salient environment with its poor corrosion resistance and inferior wear properties.

The structure of DuraChrome is fundamentally different. This process ensures that micro crack patterns are formed, meaning surface cracks do not lead directly to the base material (Fig. 2). The route is tortuous so it excludes corrosive substances for a far longer period of time, making it the more economical option.

 

Fig. 1 - Standard Chrome Crack Pattern
Fig. 1 - Standard Chrome Crack Pattern
Fig. 2 - DuraChrome Crack Pattern
Fig. 2 - DuraChrome Crack Pattern
Fig 3. - Hardness of DuraChrome vs Standard Hard Chrome
Fig 3. - Hardness of DuraChrome vs Standard Hard Chrome